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Found Francis Marion Brazier

Francis Marion Brazier was Captured by the Union Army on Dec. 24, 1863 in Miller Co., MO and was taken to Rolla, Mo. were he was sentenced on Jan. 6, 1864 to one year hard labor in the Alton Illinois Prison for Confederate Soldier's and Citizens. He attemped an escape on Sept.10, 1864 and was shot and killed. The information handed down through the family was that he received word that his home was burned and he asked to leave to help his family. His request was denied and he and decided to leave anyway. The family said he swam across the river and was shot when he reached the other side, but the war records say that he was shot on the state grounds. In Dec.9,1862 he fought in the battle at Prairie Grove Arkansas and after the battle most of his unit deserted and they swam across the river and went home. We feel that the two stories were combined giving the wrong information.
Here is information that I found on the Prison at Alton;
Alton Civil War Prison was established February 9, 1862 when the first Confederate prisoners were delivered there. The prison was housed in the abandoned Illinois State Penitentiary built in 1831 and located near the Mississippi River in Alton Illinois.
The prison was built in the style of a fortress, made of stone with walls 30 feet high. Initially the prison held 24 cells.
During the 3 years of use during the Civil War, almost 12,000 Confederate soldiers were incarcerated at Alton Prison.
The exact death toll is not known but reports estimate 1500-2200 Confederate soldiers died within the walls of this infamous military prison. Due to neglect of the old cemetery, all graves of those who died at Alton Prison are unidentifiable. There is a monument, however, erected by the U.S. Government. The granite monument is 40 feet tall surrounded by an iron fence. Bronze plaques adorn the monument and are engraved with names and military units of all known Confederates who found their final resting place in the cemetery at Alton.
  



  

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